Courses on Offer

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Undergraduate Courses

SEMESTER ONE

MB430 Exploring God's Word

This course provides a board overview of the Bible as God’s ongoing story of creation and humanity. It will introduce students to key people and their stories from both the Old and New Testament, while providing a framework for understanding reoccurring theological themes. It will consider how the Bible is still relevant for shaping individual and communal stories today.

MB526 Insights into Church History

This course covers key themes from church history in the period 1500 AD to 2000 AD and provides a foundation for those wanting to study further in this area. The themes are drawn from the Reformation, the modern church, mission history and New Zealand history.

MB531 Introduction to the Old Testament

This course is an introduction to reading and interpreting the Old Testament. It provides an overview of the OT, its historical-cultural setting, literary features and overarching theological themes. It also explores how different types of literature in the OT are to be interpreted within their own ancient context and from a Christian perspective as well as how their theological message may be applied today. Students will get practice at basic exegetical skills using OT texts aiming to provide sound basis for further biblical study.

MB6/724 Humanity and Hope

An exploration of the Christian understanding of the nature of human beings and the concept of Christian hope.

MB630 Understanding Culture

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theory and basic skills of understanding and interrogating culture. In so doing, it seeks to demonstrate how culture has a profound impact on the ways in which we view our own contexts, ourselves, and others’ situations.

MB6/732 Pentateuch
This course explores the theological themes and meaning of the Pentateuch (from Genesis to Deuteronomy), which forms the foundation of Israel’s faith and conduct and is fundamental to understanding the Old Testament. In the course students will explore how the story of the beginnings (Gen 1-11) and the patriarchal narratives (Gen 12-50), the exodus, the giving of the Law and Israel’s wilderness wanderings (Exod-Num), as well as Moses’ farewell sermons (Deuteronomy) help us to understand God’s character and plan for His people and the world.
MB6/736 Gospels: John

This course gets beneath the surface of John’s Gospel. Why was it written in that particular way? What are its distinctive emphases? What does it contribute to our understanding of Jesus and the church’s faith, and how does it speak to our own day?

MF409 Learning to Live

This course allows the student to receive accreditation for supervised participation within a number of appropriate ministry contexts. Over the year the student will participate in 240 hours of practical ministry and will reflect upon this with the coordinator, a mentor, in a peer group, in a reflective essay and in a personal journal project.

MF421 Christian Worldview
This course will explore the concept of worldview as a foundation for what it means to be a disciple of Jesus Christ in a complex world, enabling students to articulate a Christian perspective on the world. The course will investigate the two ‘stories’, or worldviews, in which New Zealand Christians must operate and, using this, students will examine various aspects of life to help them effectively interact and engage with the wider community.
MM561 Introduction to Pastoral Care

This course introduces learners to the theory and practice of pastoral care in a Christian framework involving an exploration of the biblical, theological, historical, and psychological underpinnings of pastoral care and the role that self-awareness and self-care plays in the lives of pastoral care givers. Several issues that are frequently encountered in pastoral care such as crises, grief, cancer and questions on listening to God are explored.

MM6/794 Poverty, Transformation and the Gospel

This course considers the challenges that issues of poverty and injustice pose to Christian faith and action, Current development theories and practice will be introduced and considered in relation to Biblical and theological perspectives on such themes as the gospel, the kingdom and the mission of God. The course will resource participants to evaluate various development approaches and construct proposals for Christian practice in Aotearoa and overseas.

MS510 Te Ao Māori

This course introduces the student to the Māori world, explaining the concept, and use, of whakapapa in relation to Māori Christian spirituality and history. It also covers the historical impact of the Treaty of Waitangi and its place in church and the wider NZ society today.

MS6/705 Christian Spirituality

This course explores Christian Spirituality—how to live out the Christian faith—from a biblical, theological, and historical perspective. It introduces students to the major traditions and classic writings within Christian spirituality and engages with a selection of the most pressing issues in contemporary spirituality and ministry. This is a very practical course. Students will discover, practise and discuss a range of spiritual disciplines that will nurture their spiritual growth and sustain their witness and ministry.

Block and Non Classroom Courses

MM572 Foundations of Youth Ministry

This course aims to introduce students to ideas and practices that are fundamental to youth ministry in New Zealand. It will encourage students to begin the journey of thinking theologically and philosophically about youth ministry. Students will develop pragmatic/ practical skills within the ministry context as well as engaging with a range of recent scholarship that highlights various approaches to, and ethos of youth ministry.

MM665 Missional Leadership
Building an understanding of leadership based on Biblical, theological and spiritual convictions and relating this to ministry and mission contexts.

Field Education Courses

MF5/6/701 Reflective Field Education 1/2/3

This course uses experience of practical ministry as a basis for biblical and theological reflection and personal growth. Within a half-year period the student will perform 100 hours of practical ministry and reflect upon this with a supervisor, in an online peer group, and in a portfolio and essay. Students may be practitioners in a variety of contexts including pastoral leadership, youth leadership, children and family leadership and cross-cultural/missional ministry.
NB// The supervisor and ministry must be approved by the Co-ordinator of Field Education prior to the first day of the semester for first year students.

MF5/6/705 Contextual Theological Praxis 1/2/3 - Internship Youth Discovery

This course allows the student to receive credit for supervised training received in an appropriate ministry context. Over the year the student will perform 240 hours of practical ministry and will reflect upon this with a supervisor, in an online peer group, through the compilation of a ministry portfolio and in an essay.

Undergraduate Courses

SEMESTER TWO

MB521 Thinking Theologically

What are the best ways to talk about our faith? Theology integrates various sources of information, including biblical concepts, reason, experience, tradition and culture. The special focus of this course is on theological method. Case studies are used to illustrate and master theological approaches to a range of contemporary issues.

MB532 Introduction to New Testament

This course is an introduction to reading and interpreting the New Testament. It explores the key genres of writing found in the Bible from Matthew to Revelation and then considers how to read each contextually and interpret them for today. The biblical skills required for interpretation and exegesis writing are also covered, aiming to provide a sound basis for further biblical study.

MB6/720 Christology
A study of the central themes concerning the person and work of Christ. The themes selected are considered in both their historical and theological aspects. Attention is also given to the examination and critique of Christological expression in contemporary church life.
MB6/738 Revelations and the Justice of God
This course explores the original meaning and significance of the book of Revelation with a special focus on its message of God’s justice. In exegeting the text, this course considers the importance of genre, interpretative method, historical background, context, and theology for understanding Revelation’s message of hope and justice for those living in an unjust world. In conjunction with exegeting the text, this course will examine the reception history of Revelation and note its usage and impact by Christians living in the midst of trials.
MB6/744 1 Corinthians
Paul’s correspondence with the church in Corinth permits us to glimpse some of the realities and challenges of life in the early Christian communities in the Greco-Roman world. In this course we shall explore the historical, social and religious context of 1 Corinthians, follow Paul’s response to theological issues, ethical questions, and practical problems that had arisen, and consider what this letter might say to the church today. Key learning areas for this course are leadership, Paul and women, sexual ethics, and charismatic gifts.
MB6/748 Biblical Narrative (Old Testament)
This course studies a particular aspect of Biblical Studies probing historical background, method, function, ideas and the implication and application for today.
MF402 Making Life Work

This course will examine various facets of life that students will encounter during their Intermission year. Students will explore through both biblical and theological approaches how they might interact with, and respond to these facets effectively as young Christians. This course will explore and probe a range of life facets, including: work, family, friendships, money, church, missional flatting, spirituality, holistic mission.

MF409 Learning to Live

This course allows the student to receive accreditation for supervised participation within a number of appropriate ministry contexts. Over the year the student will participate in 240 hours of practical ministry and will reflect upon this with the coordinator, a mentor, in a peer group, in a reflective essay and in a personal journal project. This course is focused on developing the student’s personal formation and self-awareness for ministry and follows a model of Reflective Practice.

MF478 Faith Engaging Social Issues

This course aims to enable Intermission students to engage with various social contexts and issues, and to practice the process of theological reflection in regard to those situations and topics. Students will interact with issues such as the environment, war, poverty, gender, immigration and sexuality.

MI700 Integrative Project

The Integrative Project, typically undertaken in the final year of the Bachelor of Applied Theology programme, is an opportunity for students to draw on their learning across the Applied Theology curriculum in order to resource understanding and faithful action in relation to an issue at the intersection of their faith, context and practice. Utilizing the integrative framework of Word, World and Work participants will make use of a range of sources of knowledge and approaches to understanding, bringing their faith, contexts and examples of practice into conversation with each other. Having considered the topic and questions that arise in relation to it from within each of those areas, students will develop a faithful Christian response to the issue (in one of a number of possible forms) that demonstrates attentiveness to faith, context and practice.

MM581 Mission of God

This course is a gateway into Carey’s Applied Theology programme. Various strands of learning in Bible, theology, spirituality, history, culture and society, and the practice of ministry and mission are introduced with a common orientation towards knowing and serving God within the community of God’s people as participants in God’s mission.

MM6/768 Adolescent Spirituality

This course will explore the process of adolescent development and its complexities and consider how a growing sense of spirituality might be nurtured during adolescent years. Students will learn about adolescent development, including biological and sociological perspectives, as well as some difficulties within the field of adolescent research. Spiritual formation in adolescents will also be explored, including theories of formation, research on the effectiveness of current models of faith formation, and key practices that contribute to spiritual formation in young people. Discussion and evaluation of the course concepts will occur in light of the students’ own faith stories and experience in congregations.

Block and Non Classroom Courses

MM565 Faith Formation in Children

This course examines issues surrounding children and the church. It covers areas such as child development and its relationship to faith development and integration of children into the wider church congregation.

MM663 Introduction to Preaching

This course provides students with an introduction to the theology and practice of Christian preaching. It starts by considering the nature and importance of preaching for the church’s life and mission. It then moves into the principles and skills of effective preaching. The course will equip students with a sound methodology for preparing and delivering sermons that are faithful, clear, relevant and engaging. It will introduce them to a range of different sermon types and the basic principles of effective oral communication. And it will help students to consider the qualities and practices that are essential to sustaining a preaching ministry. This is a very interactive course with considerable class time devoted to practising skills and evaluating sermons.

Field Education Courses

MF5/6/701 Reflective Field Eduation 1/2/3

This course uses experience of practical ministry as a basis for biblical and theological reflection and personal growth. Within a half-year period the student will perform 100 hours of practical ministry and reflect upon this with a supervisor, in an online peer group, and in a portfolio and essay. Students may be practitioners in a variety of contexts including pastoral leadership, youth leadership, children and family leadership and cross-cultural/missional ministry.
NB// The supervisor and ministry must be approved by the Co-ordinator of Field Education prior to the first day of the semester for first year students.

Postgraduate Courses

MA801 Research Methods in Applied Theology

It is commonly said that the researcher is the main instrument, shaping every aspect of a research project. Carey’s research methods course encourages self-reflexivity in order to understand your impact as the researcher while you shape a research project applied to a real-world issue of importance to you. The Class will engage with a wide range of research practitioners, learning from their experience and together critically examining research methods across the traditional Christian disciplines and their intersection with related disciplines. You will design a research project that integrates different types of knowledge in order to inform the thriving of God’s church and world, and be ready to conduct your own research project within a rich and diverse community of Christian researchers at Carey.

MA805 Human Flourishing: Looking Back, Looking Forward
God is flourishing in itself and shares that flourishing life with creation–not because God needs to create, but in some sense, God wants to create. In creating, God ordered all creation toward its full flourishing. While, that flourishing has also been thwarted, God has still provided means for this to be restored and even deepened. This course will focus especially on human flourishing, assuming this is what God intends for humankind. To inform what is meant by flourishing, we will look at biblical, theological, and psychological perspectives on the flourishing life. This will entail looking back to understand that which impedes us from flourishing and looking forward as we envisage what flourishing may look like in the future.
MA810 Special Topic: Leading in the Foosteps of Jesus

This course asks why various models of leadership found in the biblical text may have been helpful to the church in their ancient socio-historical contexts and how they may provide insights into contemporary ministry leadership. Students will engage the writings of Luke-Acts and the letter to the Philippians and the models of leadership they present. These models of leadership will be explored in the socio-historical milieu of the New Testament and interpreted in the crowded marketplace of classical ideas about leadership. The course will exegete New Testament texts and classical Graeco-Roman sources to critically compare their various approaches to leadership. The insights gained from studying biblical approaches to leadership in their ancient setting will enable students to critically reflect on competing modern ideas about leadership and recalibrate their approaches to leadership in Aotearoa.

MA821 Research Essay

The Research Essay provides students with an opportunity to undertake an in-depth study of a topic or issue in Applied Theology under the guidance of supervisor. The topic will normally be in an area that the student wishes to explore but is outside the scope of available courses in the academic programme. The student will acquire specialist knowledge of a specific field and develop skills in research, the evaluation of evidence and the articulation of ideas.

MA829 Public Theology and the Church

Public theology is “the church reflectively engaging with those within and outside its institutions on issues of common interest and for the common good” (Day and Kim). This course explores the church’s biblical, theological, and historical resources for the task of public theology and public witness to the gospel. We will critically examine models of public theology and a range of cases studies that will equip us to engage theologically with contemporary issues in society. Students will examine current social issues such as climate change, extremism and terrorism, sexual abuse, racism, modern slavery, and COVID-19 and produce theological responses that serve the church and the public good.

Jayde Galbraith, student

“Even though I grew up in church, I realised my knowledge of God and the Bible was quite poor. In my time at Carey, I have become closer to God as I have learnt more about God. It has also been amazing to work as a Children’s Pastor while studying, and seeing the two go hand-in-hand. Studying at Carey has equipped me to confidently know and explain why I believe what I believe.”

– Jayde Galbraith, Graduate, Bachelor of Applied Theology

“At Carey we believe that the God of mission is at work in the world by the Spirit to renew people and places in Christ. Our calling is to equip Christian leaders with the convictions, competencies, and capacity to participate in that mission, bringing gospel renewal in churches and communities across Aotearoa and around the world.”

– John Tucker, Principal